Pig Feeding Guide

Feeding pigs depends a lot on how old the pigs are. If they are reproducing, the state they are in at the time is an indication of how they should be fed. Foraging pigs should be allowed to obtain some food on their own but should also be given supplements to make sure all they get the necessary nutrients. Foraging pigs eat a variety of things they find such as apples, acorns, brambles and since by nature pigs are omnivores they will eat the occasional earthworm. Also any other fruits and vegetables are good for pigs as long as the fruits and vegetables are not from a kitchen. Food from a kitchen or anywhere that meat is sold cannot be given to pigs that are being bred for commercial production under law. More specifically, it is illegal to feed any household waste to pigs that are being bred for production purposes. This is due to the threat of disease from contamination by animal by-products.

Feed supplements help balance the diet of pigs

In addition to these foods a feed supplement should be fed to pigs. Feed supplements are designed to give animals all or part of the daily nutrients they need to be in optimal condition for breeding or commercial production. Feed supplements come in a variety of forms such as pencils, cakes and meal. The supplements are made from combining many of the foods that animals already eat into a balanced mixture.

Feeding pigs changes when they are breeding

Pigs like their food wet. If you are preparing feed for pigs you should add water to moisten the feed, goats milk is also good for this purpose but keep in mind the milk cannot be waste from a kitchen. When feeding pigs it is best to have troughs to help ensure all the pigs get enough food. This may seem unnecessary but when pigs are foraging, the most aggressive pigs get more food and less aggressive pigs sometimes do not get enough to eat. Having pig troughs helps solve this problem.

Gilts should be given supplements to their natural diet, a good choice sow breeder pencils, cakes or meal specifically designed for gilts. This should be kept up until just before the farrowing period. Maiden gilts are in need of a lot of supplements because even though they are caring unborn young, they are still growing. So the guilt maiden will need to have her feed gradually increased until she delivers. After service there is no need to continue the regime. Once the litter is born the sow needs extra supplements to support both her own nutritional needs and to produce enough milk for the suckling piglets.